Lucas Davis

Professor, Haas School of Business
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Lucas Davis is a Professor at UC Berkeley’s Haas School of Business. A member of UC Berkeley’s faculty since 2009, he teaches graduate courses in data analytics in Haas’ Full-Time and Executive MBA Programs.

In his research, Davis applies data analytics to the study of energy markets. Working with large datasets from companies like Pacific Gas and Electric and Southern California Edison, he explores ways to improve the efficiency of energy systems and to better incorporate data and empirical evidence into business and policy decision-making.

Davis has published 30+ peer-reviewed papers including publications in the Journal of Political Economy, American Economic Review, Proceedings of the National Academy, and other topic outlets. He serves as Faculty Director of the Energy Institute at Haas, co-editor of the American Economic Journal: Economic Policy, and Research Associate at the National Bureau of Economic Research.

Davis’ research has been recently featured in top international media outlets including the Economist, Wall Street Journal, New York Times, Financial Times, and Washington Post.

Davis has given 100+ invited presentations on data analytics and energy economics including recent presentations at Stanford University, the University of Chicago, Paris School of Economics, and the American Economic Association. Prior to moving to UC Berkeley, Davis was an Assistant Professor of Economics at the University of Michigan and a Visiting Assistant Professor at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He received a PhD in Economics from the University of Wisconsin in 2005.

Programs for Individuals 

Publications & Media

Papers & Articles 

Are Energy Executives Rewarded for Luck?

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Does Better Information Lead to Better Choices? Evidence from Energy-Efficiency Labels

VIEW

Prospects for Nuclear Power

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All Charged Up, No Place to Go

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VIEW MORE
Programs for Individuals 

Publications & Media

Papers & Articles 

Are Energy Executives Rewarded for Luck?

VIEW

Does Better Information Lead to Better Choices? Evidence from Energy-Efficiency Labels

VIEW

Prospects for Nuclear Power

VIEW

All Charged Up, No Place to Go

VIEW
VIEW MORE